I’m just back from a night of playtesting at the weekly Cambridge Playtest meetup – managed to get in plays of a couple of games I am hoping to show to publishers at Essen, and overall they went pretty well! Still a lot to do over the next month though!

Today’s idea comes a little from the game Pastiche, in which players are mixing paint colours in order to make new colours and paint certain paintings. What if you could have a similar idea of complementary elements that mix in different ways, but you did this with flavours instead?

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Day 71: New Flavours

In the game, players are up and coming chefs practised in the art of molecular gastronomy, where they are trying to create new tastes and sensations by mixing existing flavours and foods in interesting combinations. Each different flavour is represented by a card, and there are different customers and food critics that have different tastes and preferences who are coming to your restaurant. Your job is to try and make the most exciting dishes with new flavours, while trying not to risk too much and create a dud.

This risk is represented by different colours on the flavours. Flavours with the same colour are complementary, and go well together. In the game, whenever you combine two or more different flavours in a dish, you roll a specific coloured die matching the flavour for each card. Essentially you are trying to get matching symbols, and this is easier to do if you are rolling a lot of dice of the same colour (which have the same mix of symbols). The more matches you get, the more successful the dish is; however if you have no pairs within the dice you rolled, the dish is a failure and you score no points for it.

There could also be various ways you could train yourself and research into what flavours work well together, which is represented in game by being able to reroll some dice, or change the colour of cards.

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This game could be made much bigger and more like a Eurogame by adding more mechanisms, but I’m not sure if that is the way it wants to be. What it really needs is an interesting mechanism for the customers and critics to go with the dice, and it could be a fun little game. It would be nice if it could be educational as well, as you could learn what foods and flavours do go well with each other!

Alternatively, the combinations and their relative successes could be done through an app (a little like Alchemists), but I’m not sure if this is the best way to go. What do you think?